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The Sussex holiday cottage blog » 1066 and all that!

1066 and all that!

Posted 6 October 2011 by Andrew Gardner google authorship button

This month is the 945th anniversary of the Battle of Hastings where England changed forever and almost certainly the single most significant event on the soil of Sussex.

The Battle of Hastings fought on 14 October 1066, changed English history. We all know that William the Conqueror landed at Pevensey and defeated the army of King Harold at Battle.where Battle Abbey now stands. Well perhaps that's not the case!

In his book Secrets of the Norman Invasion, author Nick Austin presents the results of 25 years of research. He believes the Normans landed at Upper Wilting Farm in the Domesday Parish of Crowhurst on the outskirts of Hastings and that the Battle of Hastings was fought in the Crowhurst Valley in East Sussex. His sources include the Bayeaux Tapestry, The Carmen of Hastingae, the Chronicle of Battle Abbey and other accounts written within 150 years of the invasion as well as the Domesday Book.

One argument is based upon the coastline map of the area which has changed enormously since 1066. In simple terms it would not have been possible for William's soldiers to have marched from Pevensey to Battle because it was all under water.

Well this is challenging the accepted view of one of the important dates in our history. Definitely recommended for those who enjoy a challenging interlectual read.

On the English Heritage website Partscape states: "Although the battle has left no visible traces on the landscape nor have any remains been found, its location and the main events are known from a variety of historical sources."

Did William really clean the site of the battle so thoroughly afterwards?

Might be worth a visit down to investigate and draw your own conclusions.